Facebook tries to save face : The Indicator from Planet Money

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Frances Haugen, Facebook whistle-blower, speaks during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Subcommittee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. Photographer: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Frances Haugen, Facebook whistle-blower, speaks during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Subcommittee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. Photographer: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

All news is good news. Except when it’s not. This weekend a whistleblower by the name of Frances Haugen appeared on 60 Minutes. She worked in the tech industry for a decade and a half but says the problems at Facebook far outweigh those at other companies. She accused Facebook of knowingly undergoing business practices that were not only harmful to teens, but also accused the company of tearing society apart — even causing ethnic violence.

Jeffrey Sharlach teaches management communication at NYU Stern. He explains best practices for companies in a bind. And Wharton Professor Jonah Berger explains how to change the conversation so that it flows the way you want it to. Today on the show: crisis management.

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